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Eddie Rhodes Gallery houses Seminar 6 art

currutia.advocate@gmail.com

Published: Monday, November 5, 2012

Updated: Monday, November 5, 2012 15:11

Checking it out

Sayra Hernandez / The Advocate

Dave Wheeler browses through work created by Seminar 6 on Oct. 25. The art will be shown at the Eddie Rhodes Gallery until Nov. 21.

Since opening on Oct. 19, students and faculty alike can now view the “Pots for the Table” exhibit in the Eddie Rhodes Gallery in A-5 hosted by Seminar 6.

“Seminar 6 is a ceramics critique group and originally we hosted a gallery two years ago (at Eddie Rhodes) and the reception was very good,” ceramic artist Allen Perlof said.

The ceramic pottery on display took the form of functional, every day use items such as plates, bowls, platters, cups, mugs, vases, pedestals, pitchers and teapots.

“My pottery is definitely a work in progress,” Perlof said. “I’ve been doing ceramics for 40 years and it has always been in the fashion of functional wear. I’ve done plates, bowls, platters, slips, vases, pedestals, and it is all constantly evolving.”

The show in the gallery continues through Nov. 21 and operating hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Artists Kelly Solari, Margaret Norman,  Claudia Wedell and Perlof put the collection together. The four of them, with former members Nancy Wood and Dianne Jerome who are not showing their work, make up the group Seminar 6.

The remaining four kept the name Seminar 6 to represent and honor everyone who was involved.

Wood said Wedell decided to take a break from the group six months ago. Jerome died in 2010 after a battle with cancer.

Norman said, “Dianne was a true inspiration to us, but I don’t think we are influencing too much on each other. We work off suggestions made from critiquing.”

Kelly Solari said constructive criticism helps the student learn and improve.

Solari said, “We are all trying to push to the next level and people who work in this type of pottery are part of a subset that is functional pottery. Through critique we elevate each other in our work.”

The group members of Seminar 6 are all former students of fine and media arts professor Mary Law.

“I met most of them 15 years ago and I’ve been teaching (ceramics on campus) for almost 25 years,” Law said. “The summer seminars started after the students protested about continuing the class and I held them at my studio.”

Wedell said she and Solari had taken the ceramics course at the same time, while Allen had taken it beforehand and Norman, Jerome, Wood followed suit.

The six members bonded after meeting at the seminars and formed the critique group to further better themselves in their work through suggestions and helpful observations.

Norman said, “We were inspired by Mary and on a monthly basis we bring work and critique work, and like anything else you enjoy, it’s a great feeling to see the result of your creativity.”

Art major Carolyn Taaning agreed.

“I think it is one of the best shows they have had here and they’re all students of Mary Law,” she said.

“It is interesting to see how the group develops their profession and can see the outcome of their work being that the (clay forming methods) show how their personality comes through.”

 

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